ABOUT SMCR

Founded in 1977 by a multidisciplinary group of women who were pioneers in understanding the centrality of menstrual cycle research to women’s health, we are a nonprofit, interdisciplinary and global research volunteer-led organization.

We are researchers in the social sciences, the natural sciences and the humanities, health care providers, policy makers, health activists, artists and students from a wide range of fields with interests in the role of menstrual and ovulatory health across the life span.

MISSION

Our mission is to be the source of guidance, expertise, and ethical considerations for researchers, practitioners, policy makers and funding resources interested in the menstrual cycle.

OBJECTIVES

Our purpose as a Society is:

  • to inform public policy for the enhancement of women’s health.
  • to identify research priorities, to recommend research strategies, and to promote interdisciplinary woman-centered and gender-sensitive research on the menstrual cycle.
  • to generate and exchange information and to promote public discussion of issues related to the menstrual cycle.
  • to examine the practical, ethical and policy issues surrounding menstrual cycle research.
  • to provide a formal communication network to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogue about menstrual cycle events in the context of women’s health over the life span.

SMCR History

This short film (20 min) was produced by JoEllen Wilbur and Alice Dan. It features interviews with founding members of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research and other leaders of the organization. These interviews were conducted at the 2003 meetings in Pittsburgh.

The Periodical

The Society for Menstrual Cycle Research publishes a newsletter, called The Periodical, for its members three times each year. View the latest to learn about what the society and it’s members are doing in the community.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Chris Bobel

President

Chris Bobel is Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA. Her scholarship lies at the intersection of social movements, gender, health and embodiment, or how feminist thinking becomes feminist doing at the most intimate and immediate levels. She is the author of The Paradox of Natural Mothering, New Blood: Third Wave Feminism and the Politics of Menstruation and co-editor of Embodied Resistance: Breaking the Rules, Challenging the Norms. Her current project is an ethnographic study of menstrual health campaigns targeting school girls in the Global South. In short, she finds bodies and their taboos endlessly fascinating.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Jessica Barnack-Tavlaris

Secretary

Jessica Barnack-Tavlaris, PhD, MPH, is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at The College of New Jersey. Her specialties include attitudes toward menstruation, menstrual suppression, sexual risk, health disparities, and public health. She is the Book/Media Review Editor of SMCR’s journal Women’s Reproductive Health.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Tomi-Ann Roberts

Director

Tomi-Ann Roberts is the Winkler Herman Professor of Psychology at Colorado College. Her research interests include the sexual objectification of girls and women, self- objectification, and consequences of these for emotions and attitudes regarding menstruation and other matters of reproductive health.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Jane Ussher

Director

Jane Ussher is Professor of Women’s Health Psychology at University of Western Sydney. She has been researching gendered health since she started her PhD in 1983. Her research focuses on examining gendered factors underlying mental health problems, subjectivity and identity in relation to the reproductive body and sexuality, and gendered issues in cancer and cancer care.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Janette Perz

Director

Janette Perz is an Associate Professor in the Centre for Health Research at the University of Western Sydney. She researches in the field of reproductive and sexual health with a particular focus on gendered experiences, subjectivity, and identity.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Breanne Fahs

Activist

Breanne Fahs is an Associate Professor of women & gender studies at Arizona State University, where she specializes in studying women’s sexuality, critical embodiment studies, radical feminism, and political activism. She is also a clinical psychologist specializing in sexuality, couples work, and trauma recovery.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Ingrid Johnston-Robledo

Past President

Ingrid is Dean of Arts & Sciences at Castleton State College. Her research specialties include the psychology of women’s embodiment, with particular emphasis on women’s attitudes toward their reproductive functions.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Evelina Weidman Sterling

President Elect

Evelina Weidman Sterling, PhD, MPH, MCHES, is a Lecturer of Sociology at Kennesaw State University, public health educator and researcher specializing in reproductive and women’s health issues. Currently, she serves as an independent consultant having helped dozens of non-profit organizations, universities, and government agencies with all aspects of program development, implementation and evaluation.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Jerilynn Prior

Director

Jerilynn Prior is Professor of Endocrinology at the University of British Columbia and Scientific Director of the Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research (CeMCOR). She does research related to practical health issues for women such as the prevalence of ovulation disturbances, changes in perimenopause and effects of hot flushes/flashes (vasomotor symptoms).

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Sheryl Mendlinger

Director

Sheryl Mendlinger is with the Institute on Urban Health Research at Northeastern University. Her expertise is the intergenerational transmission of knowledge among multicultural populations, focusing on the menstrual cycle.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Maureen McHugh

Director

Maureen McHugh is a Professor of Psychology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania where she teaches Psychology of Women, Human Sexuality, Diversity Issues and Social Psychology. She has published on a wide range of topics including gender differences, feminist methods and violence against women.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

David Linton

Newsletter Editor

David Linton is Professor Emeritus of Communication Arts at Marymount Manhattan College in New York City.  His research, teaching and publications focus on the social construction of menstruation, particular via advertising, film and television representations.

Preferred pronouns: he/his

Margaret L. (Peggy) Stubbs

Treasurer

Margaret L. (Peggy) Stubbs is Professor Emerita of Psychology at Chatham University in Pittsburgh PA. Her specialties include psychosocial aspects of menstruation; attitudes towards menstruation, pubertal development; and menstrual education throughout the lifespan.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Mindy J. Erchull

Director

Mindy J. Erchull is a social psychologist who works as an Associate Professor of Psychological Science at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia.  She has broad research interests in feminist identity, the objectification and sexualization of women, and women’s reproductive health.  Her research related to the menstrual cycle center around attitudes and education.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Joan C. Chrisler

Director

Joan C. Chrisler is Professor of Psychology at Connecticut College. Her specialties include PMS, attitudes toward menstruation and menopause, sociocultural aspects of menstruation, and cognitive and behavioral changes across the menstrual cycle. She is the founding editor of SMCR’s journal Women’s Reproductive Health.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Heather Dillaway

Director

Heather Dillaway is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Her research focuses primarily on how women’s experiences of menopause and midlife are shaped by their social locations and contemporary social contexts.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Jax J. Gonzalez

Director

Jax J. Gonzalez is a menstrual activist and Masters Candidate in Sociology and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality studies at Brandeis University. Her research surrounds queering menstruation and the potential roles menstrual and sexual subjectivities play in the classroom during puberty curricula in the Elementary setting, or how educators manage “teaching the taboo.”

Preferred pronouns: she/her

Laura Wershler

Blog Editor-in-Chief

Laura Wershler is a veteran women’s health advocate and writer who volunteered and worked for pro-choice sexual and reproductive health organizations in Canada for over 25 years. In 2011 she received a post-graduate certificate in journalism from Mount Royal University in Calgary, Canada. Laura has a special interest in holistic reproductive health care and menstrual cycle advocacy.

Preferred pronouns: she/her

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